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Disaster Planning for animal owners

Ready Your Animal (Things to do prior)

  • Make sure your animal is wearing ID tags with your most up-to-date contact information.

  • Microchip your animal as a more permanent form of identification. In case collars or tags come off.

  • Train your animal to feel comfortable going in and out of a crate.

  • Always bring your animal indoors at the first sign of a warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented and wander away from the home in a crisis.

  • Check evacuation routes

  • Move livestock to higher ground. DO not leave them in an enclosed building and make sure a trailer is available in the event of an evacuation.

Prepare Your Home

  • Ideally, you should evaluate your pet, but if you are unable to do so, a rescue alert sticker placed near your front door will let first responders know that you have an animal inside your home.

  • If sheltering in place, consider these things when choosing your safe room:

    • Be aware of hazards such as windows, flying debris, etc.

    • Utility rooms, bathrooms, and unfinished basements may be easier to clean if your pet has an accident.

    • Having a supply of fresh water is particularly important in areas that may lose electricity, fill up bathtubs and sinks ahead of time to ensure that you have access to water during a power outage or other crisis.

    • In the event of flooding, go to the highest location in your home, or a room that has access to counters or high shelves where your animal can take shelter.

Locate a Temporary Caregiver. (if your animal can not stay with you after evacuation)

  • Contact your veterinarian for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities.

  • Identify hotels or motels outside of your immediate area that accept pets

  • Ask friends and relatives outside of your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your animal temporarily.

  • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets.

What to do after ( Assess home and pets)

  • Keep pets safely confirmed

  • Check home and property for damage.

  • make sure your fencing is intact and all animals are accounted for if left behind.

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Create an Emergency Kit

  • Obtain a crate that comfortably fits your animal. Write your animal’s name and your contact information on a piece of duct tape and stick it on the outside of the crate in case you become separated from your dog.

  • Make a portable emergency kit that includes the following:

    • Medical records (kept in a waterproof container)

    • Water (7 days' worth of bottled)

    • Water bowls/ food bowls

    • Pet food (3-7days worth of canned food with pop tops or dry food, Reminder that food will need to be rotated out based on expiration date)

    • Any pet medications- (Two-week supply)

    • Pet first aid kit

    • Dish soap and disinfectant

    • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up

    • Disposable garbage bags

    • Extra collar, harness, and leash

    • Flashlight

    • Blanket (to scoop up a fearful dog)

    • recent photos of your dog(hard copy in case your phone died)

    • Toys

    • Litter box

    • Litter or paper toweling

    • Pillowcase- For cats

    • List of emergency phone numbers of relative or alternative care-taker and someone who lives outside of the area

(Consider putting the kit inside the crate and storing it near an exit)

You should also have an emergency kit for the human members of the family. Items to include: Batteries, duct tape, flashlights, radio, multi-tool, tarp, rope, permanent marker, spray paint, baby wipes, protective clothing and footwear, extra cash, rescue whistle, important phone numbers, extra medication and copies of medical and insurance information.

What to do after ( Assess home and pets)

  • Keep pets safely confirmed

  • Check home and property for damage.

  • make sure your fencing is intact and all animals are accounted for if left behind.

(Consider putting the kit inside the crate and storing it near an exit)

You should also have an emergency kit for the human members of the family. Items to include: Batteries, duct tape, flashlights, radio, multi-tool, tarp, rope, permanent marker, spray paint, baby wipes, protective clothing and footwear, extra cash, rescue whistle, important phone numbers, extra medication and copies of medical and insurance information.

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